Rights Off List Artists Bill of Rights http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/ Mon, 30 May 2016 10:27:59 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Generation P by CartridgeSave http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/generation-p-by-cartridgesave/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/generation-p-by-cartridgesave/

{tab=About This Organisation}

CartridgeSave.co.uk

traffic-light-stopCartridge Save, 5-6 Gregson Road, Stockport, SK5 7SS Tel: 0161 968 5994

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Generation P; closing date 13 May 2016|blue|open}

Generation P

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

"3) …The best 50 entries from across the categories will be selected to appear in an e-album which will be free to download from the cartridgesave.co.uk site."

Separte permission form (pdf):

"By consenting to this form, you give Cartridgesave.co.uk and Democracy PR permission to use your child’s work which may be displayed on our website or in the downloadable e-book.

"Following the announcement of the winner(s), we may use images of your child, which may appear in local or national newspapers, or online publications."

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

  1. The terms and conditions are unclear about you or your child's moral rights. Although a signed permission form is required, it is not clear if you must consent to allowing an image of your child to be used for promotion in order to claim the prize. Because the book/entry is downloadable without restriction, giving permission seems unwise because anyone may repurpose the work.

  2. Because the competition is offering a print-ready ebook for download with no time limit or restrictions on distribution, you are basically granting the organizer unlimited use of your child's work forever, and for anyone to print or repurpose the work as they choose. Printing a book and distributing it to the winning school would be wiser. There should also be a time limit on how long a likeness of your child may be used on the website or in the media. Refer to our Introduction to Rights and Licensing to better understand why you need more control over who uses your work and for what purpose.

  3. The terms and conditions appear to be granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

Promoter

Democracy PR Ltd, 62 Beech Road, Chorlton, Manchester M21 9EQ

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights, use this contact form:
http://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/printwhatmatters/books-for-schools/books-for-charity/contact/

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Published on 13 May 2016

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Sat, 14 May 2016 01:06:58 +0000
Goldwell ColorZoom D!RUPT 2016 http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/goldwell-colorzoom-d!rupt-2016/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/goldwell-colorzoom-d!rupt-2016/

{tab=About This Organisation}

Goldwell (kao Salon Division)

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

WE THINK STYLIST. We hear you. We understand that partnership is more than great products.

So let’s start a new conversation – a conversation about you – with the ultimate goal of creating true partnership. After all, that’s the essence of the new Goldwell brand – a brand in transformation, guided by our global team of passionate stylists. Now more than ever, everything we do will be dedicated to you and your success. Goldwell Brand

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see U.S. Goldwell® ColorZoom Challenge 2016; closing date 31 May 2016|blue|open}

U.S. Goldwell® ColorZoom Challenge 2016

"You love what you do, so make a name for yourself on the national and international stylist scene."

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

5. Ownership: All Submissions will become the exclusive property of Sponsor, and none may be acknowledged or returned. Sponsor and its affiliates shall have the right to edit, adapt and publish or not publish any or all of the Submissions, and may use them in any media without attribution or compensation to the entrant, his/her successors or assigns, or any other entity. UPLOADING A SUBMISSION IN THIS CONTEST CONSTITUTES ENTRANT’S IRREVOCABLE ASSIGNMENT, CONVEYANCE AND TRANSFERENCE TO SPONSOR OF ANY AND ALL RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST IN THE SUBMISSION OR ANY DERIVATIVE WORKS CREATED USING THE SUBMISSION INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ALL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, INCLUDING COPYRIGHTS. Sponsor grants eligible entrants a limited, revocable, non-sublicensable, license to use Sponsor’s name, trademarks and logos (collectively, “Sponsor’s Marks”) for the sole purpose of creating and submitting the Submission for review and assessment in this Contest. Entrants are not permitted to make any further use of Sponsor’s Marks for any purpose whatsoever. In addition, entrants recognize that all right, title, and interest in Sponsor’s Marks as well as all derivative works created using Sponsor’s Marks shall vest exclusively to the Sponsor, and entrant agrees that he/she has not and will not take any action that might harm or adversely affect such rights. No right, title, or interest in and to the Sponsor’s Marks except for the limited license granted to entrant in these Official Rules is transferred or created. Each entrant further acknowledges and agrees that Sponsor’s Marks are valid and enforceable, and that entrant shall do nothing to challenge the validity or enforceability of Sponsor’s Marks in any forum. Entrants agree that the use of Sponsor’s Marks is permitted only for the purpose of making a Submission for entry in this Contest, and that any use of Sponsor’s Marks (whether in the Submission or otherwise) beyond this scope infringes the rights of Sponsor and will result in irreparable harm to Sponsor.

6. Independently Developed Submissions. Each entrant understands and agrees that Sponsor’s use in matters independently developed of material similar to or identical with the Submission or containing features or elements similar to or identical with those contained in the Submission will not obligate Sponsor to negotiate with entrant, nor will it entitle entrant to any compensation of any kind. Each entrant agrees and acknowledges that nothing herein shall preclude Sponsor from using any material in or similar to the Submission without obligation to entrant, including, but not limited to, if Sponsor has or has determined that it has an independent legal right to use such other material, including without limitation, because such features or elements were not new or novel, or were not originated by entrant, or were or may hereafter be independently created by or submitted to Sponsor.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions are claiming your copyright. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner.

  2. Because of copyright transfer, the terms and conditions mean you lose your moral rights. This means you will not be able to object to how your work is used in future, such as it being altered in a manner you may find derogatory, or if it is used to promote a product or cause you find objectionable. You have also lost your right to be credited as the author of your work.

  3. Obviously, the terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for any purpose Sponsor wishes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organization wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition.

    You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use Sponsor wants to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this contact form: https://www.goldwell.us/contact/

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2 May, 2016

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 02 May 2016 15:46:09 +0000
Netflix "Your Art Here" http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/netflix-%22your-art-here%22/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/netflix-%22your-art-here%22/

{tab=About This Organisation}

DVD.com (a Netflix Company)

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopWelcome to Netflix! We are a subscription service that provides our members with access to motion pictures, television and other audio-visual entertainment ("movies & TV shows") streamed over the Internet to certain Internet-connected TV's, computers and other devices ("Netflix ready devices"). Netflix Terms of Use

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e,. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see "Your Art Here"; closing date 16 May 2016|blue|open}

Your Art Here

TERMS FOR SUBMISSION OF USER GENERATED CONTENT

I understand that by submitting content (“Content”) to DVD.com via mail, electronic submission, or any other method, I hereby grant to DVD.com a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, transferable right and license to use, host, store, cache, reproduce, publish, display (publicly or otherwise), distribute (via any now known or later developed method), transmit, modify, adapt, and creative derivative works of the ContentI understand that any such derivative works shall be the sole and absolute property of DVD.com, and I shall have no rights or interest thereto.  I further agree that DVD.com may elect to use my name and/or likeness in connection with the Content (although it is not required to do so).  I agree to execute all such assignments or other documents and take any actions as may be reasonably required by DVD.com to give effect to the licenses contained in this paragraph.

NETFLIX TERMS OF USE

13. Use of Information Submitted. Netflix is free to use any comments, information, ideas, concepts, reviews, or techniques or any other material contained in any communication you may send to us ("Feedback"), including responses to questionnaires or through postings to the Netflix service, including the Netflix website and user interfaces, worldwide and in perpetuity without further compensation, acknowledgement or payment to you for any purpose whatsoever including, but not limited to, developing, manufacturing and marketing products and creating, modifying or improving the Netflix service. In addition, you agree not to enforce any "moral rights" in and to the Feedback, to the extent permitted by applicable law. These terms do NOT seem limited to the "Feedback" section.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. The terms and conditions will claim your copyright if Neflix creates "creative derivative works (sic) of the Content". Such derivative works "shall be the sole and absolute property of DVD.com". The vague and grammatically incorrect "creative derivative" could mean that changing a color or resizing your work, changing format or changing the aspect ratio would give DVD.com all rights to your content. You may not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from DVD.com. You will certainly not be credited.

  2. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. Netflix may do so but are not required. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  3. The terms and conditions state that if you win, or are a potential winner, you are required to complete various additional forms or actions, i.e., "agree to execute all such assignments or other such documents and take any actions that may be necessary" to make the terms legally binding. Of course, the terms and conditions of these additional forms are not displayed but it is assumed it will be like signing a blank cheque.

  4. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. You are helping to sell a commercial product of a very successful company. You should be able to license the work for a specific time period and for a specific fee. If your work is featured on DVD.com mailers, it is worth far more than mere "exposure". DVD.com/Netlix is crowdsourcing "free" culture. (See item 5, below.)

    As if there were any question Netflex will use any submitted content forever, "Netflix Terms of Use" state that anything you send them can be freely used forever, "worldwide and in perpetuity without further compensation, acknowledgement or payment to you for any purpose whatsoever including, but not limited to, developing, manufacturing and marketing products and creating, modifying or improving the Netflix service." And you agree not to enforce your "moral rights".

  5. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work for other purposes. The operative term is "sublicensable". That term could be harmless, as in allowing the printer of the labels the right to print your art, but it can mean much more beyond that. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition.

    You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use Netflix?DVD.com want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work in what you consider inappropriate venues. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

Netflix

CONTACT

Netflix is a large company. Contacting them thru the main number, 1-800-290-8191, may not be as effective as posting on their social media accounts: Facebook, Twitter (#dvdnetflix), Pinterest, or Instagram. Urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights.

Last updated: April 30, 2016

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support. Your help will make a difference.

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 3 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Thu, 21 Apr 2016 19:57:35 +0000
Rough Guides & GapYear.com http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/rough-guides-%26-gapyear.com/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/rough-guides-%26-gapyear.com/

{tab=About This Organisation}

Rough Guides

traffic-light-stop

"Rough Guides is a leading publisher of travel and reference information known for its ‘tell it like it is’ attitude, accurate, up-to-date content and informed contemporary writing." About Us.

GapYear.com

"We're a social network and travel advice website committed to providing you with everything you need to know about taking a gap year." About Us.

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Rough Guides/GapYear Travel Writing 2016; closing date 01 May 2016|blue|open}

Rough Guides & GapYear.com Travel Writing Competition 2016

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

16. By submitting an entry, each entrant grants to the Promoter a perpetual, royalty-free, non-exclusive licence to edit, publish, translate, modify, adapt, make available and distribute the entry throughout the world in any media now known or hereafter invented. The winning entrant and the two runners up further assign to the Promoter the entire copyright and all other rights insofar as they belong to him/her of whatsoever nature in and to their entry throughout the World in any media now known or hereafter invented for the full period of copyright and all renewals and extensions thereof and the winning entrant and two runners up further waive all moral rights in his/her entry. Each entrant undertakes to complete any necessary documentation to formalise the licence. If you do not want to grant us these rights, please do not submit materials to us.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.


  1. The terms and conditions are claiming the copyright of the winner and two runners up. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner. Instead of giving up your copyright, you should negotiate use of your creative work for a specified time period.

  2. The terms and conditions require you to waive your moral rights. This means you will not be able to object to how your work is used in future, such as it being altered in a manner you may find derogatory, or if it is used to promote a product or cause you find objectionable. You have also lost your right to be credited as the author of your work. Never give up your moral rights!

  3. The terms and conditions state that if you win, or are a potential winner, you are required to complete various additional forms to legally ensure you give away your copyright and moral rights. You are assigning your work away forever and can never associate yourself with it again.

  4. For non-winning entries, the terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning photographic works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  5. As above, the terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for many other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

SPONSORS

Rough Guides, Limited 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: competitions@roughguides.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference. Please donate any amount you can.

Updated on 2016-03-30 10:16:36

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Wed, 30 Mar 2016 14:13:24 +0000
Vogue UK http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/vogue-uk/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/vogue-uk/

{tab=About This Organisation}

Vogue UK

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop"The British edition of Vogue is a fashion magazine that has been published since the autumn of 1916. The magazine's current editor stated that, “Vogue’s power is universally acknowledged. It’s the place everybody wants to be if they want to be in the world of fashion" and 85% of the magazine’s readers agree that “Vogue is the Fashion Bible” " CC Wikipedia

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo, poem, story, song, drawing, painting) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e., works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Vogue Talent Contest 2016; closing date 08 April 2016|blue|open}

Vogue Talent Contest 2016 (Miss Vogue)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

3. Copyright of entries belongs to the Condé Nast Publications Ltd.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. The terms and conditions are claiming your copyright. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner. You will not be credited because you no longer have rights to what you created.

    Copyright is valuable. NEVER GIVE AWAY YOUR COPYRIGHT - it is a basic human right. Instead, negotiate the use of what you create.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

Vogue UK, Condé Nast Publications Ltd.

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: voguetalent2016@condenast.co.uk. Or, post a comment on their competition page.

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2016-03-15 20:52:40

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 3 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:50:11 +0000
Caledonian MacBrayne http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/caledonian-macbrayne/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/caledonian-macbrayne/

{tab=About This Organisation}

Caledonian MacBrayne

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopCaledonian MacBrayne and CalMac are trading names of CalMac Ferries Limited.

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see CalMac 2017 Calendar Competition; closing date 04 March 2016|blue|open}

CalMac 2017 Calendar Competition

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

9. Copyright of the images remains with the entrant and, where possible, will be credited. You grant Caledonian MacBrayne a worldwide license in perpetuity to reproduce your photographs in any medium and for usage in marketing materials.

10. … A selection of images from email entries will be showcased on the Caledonian MacBrayne CalMac Facebook, CalMac Twitter and CalMac Instagram pages each week for promotional purposes only.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever (see Rule 9 above). For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  2. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal.

    If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition.

    You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced. This is especially true on social media (see Rule 10 above) where ownership metadata is routinely stripped. Absent any watermark, your work would be a good candidate to become an orphan work.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.


CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: enquiries@calmac.co.uk

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2016-02-22 08:44:56

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 22 Feb 2016 13:42:41 +0000
Essex ExploreCulture http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/essex-exploreculture/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/essex-exploreculture/

{tab=About This Organisation}

Essex ExploreCulture

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopExploreCulture is run by Essex County Council’s Cultural Development team, helping to support a vibrant cultural economy for everyone to enjoy. http://exploreculture.org.uk/home.html

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. (Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer - i.e., works for hire.)

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see #InstaEssex Capture the Culture; closing date 15 February 2016|blue|open}

#InstaEssex Capture the Culture

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

16) Reproduction

By entering the competition, you grant #InstaEssex and its sponsors and supporters a non-exclusive, irrevocable licence to reproduce, enlarge, publish or exhibit, on any media, the images for any purpose connected with the competition. This may include, but is not limited to:

  1. inclusion in the competition book – print & digital versions;
  2. display at any exhibitions; including but not limited to being printed on vinyl and foam-board to display at Liverpool Street station and branch line stations.
  3. on the competition website and on the websites of sponsors and supporters;
  4. for use in press, promotional and marketing materials – both print & digital;
  5. on social media used by #InstaEssex, its sponsors and supporters.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights.

  1. The phrase "for any purpose connected with the competition" is too vague. For this reason the terms and conditions are unclear with regard to how your work will be used. To be sure, entrants' images can only be used to promote the competition.

    This may seem like a fine point, but all images must be displayed in such a way that it is clear to all viewers that the images represent entries in a specific competition and are not mere decoration.

    Note: Competition images posted to social media must include some identifying information in the image itself, such as creator and competition name. Social media is notorious for stripping metadata (authorship information) in their publishing protocols, thus creating "orphan works" by the millions. See "Social Networks and Competitions" for more detail.

  2. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  3. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

SPONSORS

Abellio Greater Anglia | Essex Chronicle | Essex & South Suffolk Community Rail Partnership | Network Rail | Southend-on-Sea | thurrock.gov.uk

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: culture@essex.gov.uk

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2016-02-04 21:41:26

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Fri, 05 Feb 2016 02:37:31 +0000
Tasman Glacier Heli Hike Competition http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/tasman-glacier-heli-hike-competition/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/tasman-glacier-heli-hike-competition/ {tab=About This Organisation}

The Helicopter Line / Totally Tourism Ltd

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopThe Helicopter Line is New Zealand’s leading helicopter operating company.  Formed in 1986 when 3 separate helicopter companies combined, The Helicopter Line has grown to become the largest Kiwi owned Helicopter Company in New Zealand and the largest provider of scenic flights in the country. About

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Tasman Glacier Heli Hike Competition; closing date 23 December 2015|blue|open}

Tasman Glacier Heli Hike Competition

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

3. To enter the entrant must:

  1. Post an original photo of an outdoor adventure and tag @thehelicopterline Instagram account in the caption, along with the hashtag #TakeAHike
  2. The prize winner is responsible for the cost of travel to claim the prize, as well as accommodation on their trip and other incidental expenses. Prize cannot be redeemed for cash.

and

5. By submitting a photo the entrant is confirming that they hold usage rights to the photo and give approval for the photo to be displayed on Skyline Enterprises / Totally Tourism / The Helicopter Line websites and other publications, print and digital. (Underline ours)

and

14. All entries and any copyright subsisting in the entries become and remain the property of The Helicopter Line. Any entries may be published in any Skyline Enterprises / Totally Tourism / The Helicopter Line -associated publications.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. Item 3a: Requiring entrants to post to social media, who have separare terms and conditions, is not good practice. See "Competitions and Social Networks".

  2. Item 3b: Because of the nature of the prize, the winner must travel to collect the prize. Although our principles do not technically prohibit this, it does involve a cost burden on the winner. Given that you're already assigning your copyright, this would involve a substantial giveaway to the organizer. Copyright has great monetary value, and you should never give away copyright without asking a large fee. See #4 below.

  3. Item 5: The terms and conditions are unclear about how your work will be used. Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights. However, because the winner is forfeiting the copyright to the organizer (term 14), you have no rights at all.

  4. Item 14: The terms and conditions are claiming your copyright. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner. Claiming copyright means you must remove the submitted work from your Instagram account and forever disassociate yourself from every image you entered. You also lose moral rights (#5 below). For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing

  5. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced. However, as state above, because you have surrendered copyright to the organizer, you will never be credited nor will you have a say in how your work is used. You no longer have any connection to your entry.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists, particularly our Bill of Rights Principles.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

The Helicopter Line / Totally Tourism Ltd
PO Box 1530, Queenstown, New Zealand
Phone: +64 3 441 4623
Fax: +64 3 442 3529

CONTACT

To write to the organizer and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: buniness@totallytourism.co.nz

Correction: The preceding address is incorrectly listed on the competition website. The correct address is: business@totallytourism.co.nz

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2015-12-08 14:07:13

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Tue, 08 Dec 2015 19:04:11 +0000
World Nomads 2015 Travel Photography Scholarship http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/world-nomads-2015-travel-photography-scholarship/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/world-nomads-2015-travel-photography-scholarship/ {tab=About This Organisation}

WorldNomads.com Pty Limited

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

Our travel insurance covers people from over 150 countries, with medical and evacuation cover, 24-hour emergency assistance and cover for a large range of adventure activities. Our experienced team bring service, underwriting expertise and technology, making us the number one choice for many of the world's leading travel brands such as Lonely Planet and National Geographic Adventure. About Us

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public (photos, videos, poems, music, etc.) are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign when reported to us. Our reviews should assist you in deciding whether entering is worth your while, based on our principles.

When you create a work, the law automatically assigns you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights.

{slide=CLICK HERE for World Nomads 2015 Travel Photography Soholarship; closing date 25 November 2015|blue|open}

World Nomads 2015 Travel Photography Scholarship

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

19. It will be a condition of entry that both scholarship applicants and the scholarship recipient will grant a non-exclusive copyright license to WorldNomads.com, WWF, Intrepid Travel, Great Himalaya Trails, Kathmandu, The Australian Himalayan Foundation to reproduce the work for subsequent promotion. The scholarship winner will also grant full rights to 30 photos, as briefed prior to the assignment in Nepal by the associated scholarship partners.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions are vague and unclear about how your work will be used. Will it be only to promote the competition? For how long? Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights. With this contest, the terms apply to BOTH applicants and recipients.

  2. "…scholarship winner will also grant full rights to 30 photos…"

    Some of the terms and conditions may be claiming either your copyright or exclusive use of your work. The meaning of the phrase, "grant full rights", is not clear. If claiming your copyright, you will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner. If exclusive use, the organizer and partners will be the only ones able to use the work.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  4. The terms and conditions could be granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works, a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal. Other uses should be negotiable.

  5. The terms and conditions may be granting the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. If you are the scholarship winner, you should know what rights you are granting before you get to Nepal and decide if the remuneration is suitable for what you are granting. If any organisation wishes to use your work for purposes beyond promoting the competition, you should have the opportunity to negotiate an appropriate fee for a specific time period for the each intended use. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

SPONSORS

WorldNomads.com, WWF, Intrepid Travel, Great Himalaya Trails, Kathmandu, The Australian Himalayan Foundation

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights, use this this contact form: http://service.worldnomads.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2015-11-10 17:00:19

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Tue, 10 Nov 2015 21:59:24 +0000
WWF #CAREFORTHEOCEAN Competition http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/wwf-%23carefortheocean-competition/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/wwf-%23carefortheocean-competition/ {tab=About This Organisation}

World Wildlife Fund

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

"WWF's mission is to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth. Our vision is to build a future in which people live in harmony with nature." http://www.worldwildlife.org/about

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

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WWF #CAREFORTHEOCEAN Competition

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

All entry materials become the property of WWF and will not be acknowledged or returned. The copyright in any submission shall remain the property of the entrant, but entry in this contest constitutes entrant's irrevocable, perpetual permission and consent, without further compensation or attribution, to use the submission and the entrant's name, Instagram or Twitter handle for editorial, advertising, commercial and publicity purposes by WWF and/or others authorized by WWF, in any and all media now in existence or hereinafter created, throughout the world, for the duration of the copyright in the submission. WWF and/or others authorized by WWF shall have the right to edit, adapt, and modify the submission.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. Although the terms and conditions are not claiming your copyright, they state "All entry materials bcome the property of WWF", which is the same thing. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will have to remove that work from anywhere you posted it and will not be permitted to associate yourself with work again without permission from the new owner. Hopefully, this is a careless oversight.

  2. You are granting WWF commercial use of your work. Furthermore, you are granting "WWF and/or others authorized by WWF shall have the right to edit, adapt, and modify the submission." Usually that means reformatting to fit various distribution models, however, with the commercial use you are granting, conceiveably you would be allowing anyone WWF chooses to modify, transform and copyright any submitted images.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. Only the "winner's image" will be credited. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  4. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  5. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

WWF International, Exposure

CONTACT

No contact info for the organiser is listed, however you may use this page to contact WWF and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights.

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2015-11-02 21:54:08

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The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 3 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

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The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

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send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 19 Oct 2015 01:52:57 +0000