Rights Off List Artists Bill of Rights http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/ Mon, 22 Sep 2014 06:05:11 +0000 MYOB en-gb Quark Expeditions | Quark Cover Photo 2014 http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/quark-expeditions-%7c-quark-cover-photo-2014/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/quark-expeditions-%7c-quark-cover-photo-2014/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Quark Expeditions

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

Polar expedition service. "… we’ve taken thousands of curious travelers to corners of the world that earlier generations could only dream of visiting. Along the way, we’ve achieved an unprecedented series of firsts in polar exploration and have led the way in polar expeditions, making the Arctic and Antarctica accessible to travelers from 50 countries around the world."

Read more: http://www.quarkexpeditions.com/en/about-quark

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Quark's Photo Cover Contest; closing date 20 July 2014|blue}

Competition Name

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

14. Each entrant grants to Sponsor a worldwide, royalty-free, perpetual, non-exclusive right and license to copy, distribute, and display each submitted Photo in any media or marketing material and with right to use, copy, modify, edit, and create derivative works therefrom and agrees to execute documents confirming such right and license, at Sponsor’s reasonable request.

17. …All contest winners are required to sign a statement confirming they are the photographer of the prize photo(s) and a release to the contest sponsor in a time-frame specified by the sponsors or prize will be forfeited and another winner may be chosen.

20. (iii) he/she hereby holds the Sponsor and the Released Parties (as defined below) harmless from and against any third party claim arising from use of the photo and waives any right to inspect or approve uses of the photo to be compensated for any such uses. Participating in the Contest constitutes permission to the Sponsor and its agencies to use entrants’ names, biographical information, pictures/portraits, photo, likenesses and/or voices for purposes of advertising and trade without further compensation, unless prohibited by law. (iv) By Entering the contest, the entrance agrees to allow the Sponsors and their agency partners and affiliate to have unlimited use and unlimited rights to uses of the photo in any or all marketing material including electronic communication, printed material or promotional material worldwide for an unlimited amount of time and without compensation.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. Quark Expeditions makes it clear in their terms they wish to use submitted images for promotional, commreical purposes without reservation. Any and all liability is yours. It is your choice whether or not to enter.

The terms and conditions are unclear about how your work will be used. Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights.

  1. The terms and conditions require you to waive your moral rights. This means you will not be able to object to how your work is used in future, such as it being altered in a manner you may find derogatory, or if it is used to promote a product or cause you find objectionable. You have also lost your right to be credited as the author of your work.

  2. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  3. The terms and conditions state that if you win, or are a potential winner, you are required to complete various additional forms, but the terms and conditions of these additional forms are not displayed on the competition or appeal website. This is like being asked to sign a blank cheque. It is not an acceptable business practice to require you to accept all the terms and conditions when submitting a work but fail to display all the terms and conditions on documents you may at some stage have to complete and sign.

  4. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  5. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this contact form.

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2014-07-24 09:17:52

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:11:23 +0000
Metro Post-It Note Make It Happen http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/metro-post%11it-note-make-it-happen/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/metro-post%11it-note-make-it-happen/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Metro

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopThe Metro brand was launched in March 1999, as a London only free newspaper.  It was designed as a concise read for urbanites on the commute, filled with bite-sized news and local information for them to consume whilst on the move. Metro, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Post_it Super Sticky Notes Make It Happen; closing date 13 June 2014|blue}

 

Make It Happen

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

"…The prize is non-transferable. In consideration of Metro granting you a right to enter the promotion, you automatically grants to Associated Newspapers Ltd and Post-It ® Note an irrevocable, exclusive, royalty-free, world wide licence for the full period of copyright to use, alter, adapt or sub-licence such rights to any third party the material submitted by you. You agree to waive any moral rights you may have in the material submitted by you. All entries are printed/displayed at the editor's discretion and may be edited for publication."

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions claim exclusive use of your work. Although you will still be the copyright holder you will not be able to use your work again without permission. Competitions or appeals only require non-exclusive use of your work.

  2. The terms and conditions require you to waive your moral rights. This means you will not be able to object to how your work is used in future, such as it being altered in a manner you may find derogatory, or if it is used to promote a product or cause you find objectionable. You have also lost your right to be credited as the author of your work.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

Metro, 3M

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this link.

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2014-06-11 17:19:57

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Wed, 11 Jun 2014 21:16:42 +0000
Outdoor Photographer, The Great Outdoors Photo Contest http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/outdoor-photographer,-the-great-outdoors-photo-contest/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/outdoor-photographer,-the-great-outdoors-photo-contest/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Outdoor Photographer

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop"Outdoor Photographer is the premier magazine about outdoor photography. Our photography technique articles are geared to helping you capture the best wildlife, travel and outdoor sports photography. Review photography tips and keep up with digital photography as applied to nature photography; stay current with the latest in photography equipment."

Outdoor Photographer Magazine is published by Werner Publishing Corporation, 12121 Wilshire Boulevard, 12th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90025

 

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see The 5th Annual Great Outdoors Photo Contest; closing date 05 June 2014|blue}

 

Competition Name

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

USE OF ENTRY: By submitting an entry, entrant grants Sponsor and its designees an irrevocable, royalty-free, non-exclusive, worldwide perpetual license to use the entry and his/her name, city and state of residence for credit purposes in Sponsor’s online galleries, without further compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law. In addition, each winner grants to the Sponsor and its designees an irrevocable, royalty-free, non-exclusive, worldwide perpetual license to use and distribute the entry [(as submitted, or as cropped by Sponsor)], and his/her name, city and state of residence for credit purposes, in any and all media now or hereafter known, including without limitation in Outdoor Photographer magazine, for purposes of promotion of this Contest and other Sponsor contests and/or for purposes of advertising and promoting Sponsor and, except as otherwise stated herein, without further compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  2. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use the work of each winner beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes, including promotion of sponsor and sponsor contests, sponsor designees, and advertising. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

GigaPan Lexar Manfrotto tamrac Hoodman LumiQuest

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: contests@wernerpublishing.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2014-06-11 16:37:09

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 3 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Wed, 11 Jun 2014 20:33:09 +0000
Taylor Wessing/National Portrait Gallery Photographic Portrait Prize http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/taylor-wessing%10national-portrait-gallery-photographic-portrait-prize/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/taylor-wessing%10national-portrait-gallery-photographic-portrait-prize/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize
organized by
National Portrait Gallery

About these Organisations

traffic-light-stopNational Portrait Gallery - Founded in 1856, the aim of the National Portrait Gallery, London is ‘to promote through the medium of portraits the appreciation and understanding of the men and women who have made and are making British history and culture, and ... to promote the appreciation and understanding of portraiture in all media’.

Taylor Wessing LLP"a forward thinking international law firm for the industries of tomorrow"

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=TaylorWessing/NPG Photographic Portrait Prize; closing date 07 07 2014|blue|open}

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Edited for specifics:

  • the photographer or their representatives agree unconditionally that the National Portrait Gallery may reproduce any exhibited photographs for the purposes of marketing, promotion, discussion and education in direct connection with the Photographic Portrait Prize and exhibition, in all media worldwide including the exhibition catalogue and subsequent publications, posters, postcards, the Internet and within television documentaries, and may license these specific, limited rights to others only for the same purposes.The Gallery also reserves the right to reproduce selected images for core non–commercial purposes, for example in the Past Exhibitions page of the Gallery website, indefinitely, as a public record. The processes of the competition may be filmed, and entering the competition constitutes agreement for a portrait to be included in such filming, whether broadcast or not.
  • The winning photographer of the John Kobal New Work Award will be commissioned to create a new portrait for the National Portrait Gallery. The copyright of this newly commissioned portrait is to be assigned to the Gallery. This commissioned photograph will be submitted to the Gallery for approval of its inclusion in the National Portrait Gallery′s Photographs Collection.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions are unclear about how your work will be used. Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights. See items 3 and 4 below for further details.

  2. "The winning photographer of the John Kobal New Work Award will be commissioned to create a new portrait for the National Portrait Gallery. The copyright of this newly commissioned portrait is to be assigned to the Gallery." Rules. Comment: These terms and conditions are claiming your copyright. You will no longer be the owner of your work, legal ownership will be transferred to the organisation. You will not be permitted to use or reproduce your work again without permission from the new owner.

  3. "The Gallery also reserves the right to reproduce selected images for core non–commercial purposes, for example in the Past Exhibitions page of the Gallery website, indefinitely, as a public record." Rules. Comment: The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal. In this instance, "non-commercial purposes" is too loosely defined and subject to overly broad interpretation in the internet of today. A maximum of 5 yrs is more than fair, unless the non-winning entrants agree to a longer term. Also, it should be clarified that "public record" does not mean the image is then considered to be in the "public domain".

  4. Specifically, "the photographer … agree unconditionally that the National Portrait Gallery may reproduce any exhibited photographs for the purposes of marketing, promotion, discussion and education in direct connection with the Photographic Portrait Prize and exhibition, in all media worldwide including the exhibition catalogue and subsequent publications, posters, postcards, the Internet and within television documentaries, and may license these specific, limited rights to others only for the same purposes." (emphasis added) RulesComment: The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. In this case, in addition to violating the 5 yr limit on promoting items relating to the competition, the terms are unclear if works with be sublicensed to commercial entities. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

Taylor Wessing, LLP

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: photoprize@npg.org.uk

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2014-05-10 10:50:56

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Sat, 10 May 2014 14:45:41 +0000
Future City | Glasgow http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/future-city-%7c-glasgow/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/future-city-%7c-glasgow/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Future City | Glasgow

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stopFuture City | Glasgow is a program of the Glasgow City Council and TSB Future Cities Demonstrator Programme.

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Future City Glasgow; closing date 02 March 2014|blue}

OBJECTIONABLE TERMS AND CONDITIONS

"Under the updated terms and conditions, entrants are required to grant to GCC a non-exclusive, worldwide, perpetual, royalty free, irrevocable licence to use the images for the purposes of marketing, advertising, promotion or branding of GCC and/or the Future City | Glasgow programme in any of their publications, their websites and/or in any promotional material connected to this Competition."

"GCC are seeking a waiver of moral rights. This is in favour of GCC only i.e. you are not waiving your Moral Rights in all instances and these would be waived only in respect of GCC’s use of them in accordance with the terms and conditions."

"Further, given the volume of entries and the potential for future use of the images for GCC activities, GCC need to protect against the risk of action being taken for not attributing the images."

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. Commercial use of images is not allowed. Images used for any purpose other than to promote the competition are deemed commercial use, despite what organizers state. In other words, they are seeking free image use that they would normally be required to license. The organizer's desire to crop, color correct, retouch, and superimpose text on images further reinforces the notion that entrants' work will be used in a commercial nature for the promotion and branding of the City of Glasgow. That a government body is publishing the work does not entitle it to be exempt from a commercial use designation.

  2. The terms and conditions require you to waive your moral rights. This means you will not be able to object to how your work is used in future, such as it being altered in a manner you may find derogatory, or if it is used to promote a product or cause you find objectionable. You have also lost your right to be credited as the author of your work. We reject the organizer's claim that the work load to protect moral rights is too onerous for a government body to manage. Organizations with a far greater number of entries have no probem supporting full moral rights.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  4. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning, short-listed works a usage time limit of 3 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works forever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  5. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

Feel free to write to this organisation, submit a link to this report and urged them to adjust any future competition rules to abide by the ABoR Principles document.

Judges

Michael Thomas Jones - Photographer
www.michaelthomasjones.com
www.designersjournal.net/photographers/
michael-thomas-jones

Simon Tricker - Future City | Glasgow Design
Lead
www.open.glasgow.gov.uk

Members of the Future City | Glasgow
Design and Engagement team

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address/contact form: open@glasgow.gov.uk

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 2014-04-27 20:24:21

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 28 Apr 2014 00:17:35 +0000
Intrepid Travel Photo Competition http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/intrepid-travel-photo-competition/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/intrepid-travel-photo-competition/ {tab=About This Organisation}

Intrepid Travel

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop"Intrepid Travel has grown to become a major, multi-national company taking almost 100,000 passengers to over 100 destinations each and every year. Since being founded in 1989, the company has grown to have a turnover of $129 million.…Acquisitions and partnerships since 2006 include: - Purchase of UK-based Africa specialist, Guerba World Travel, including its sales and marketing business in the UK and its operations company in Kenya, Africa - Expanded overland product with a strategic investment in leading overland trip company, Dragoman…Most recently (in February 2011), it signed a strategic venture with the world's largest leisure travel group, TUI Travel PLC that combines Intrepid Travel with TUI Travel PLC's international portfolio of adventure travel brands to create PEAK Adventure Travel Group, an independently managed company specialising in the fast growing adventure travel market. PEAK Adventures consists of over 20 businesses with combined revenue circa A$400 million. 
CC Wikipedia

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE for Intrepid Travel Photo Competition terms; closing 30 June annually|blue}

 

Intrepid Travel Photo Competition

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

By submitting the photographs (i) you are agreeing to license all rights in them to Intrepid Travel (and its providers and affiliates) for use in company brochures, promotions and advertising and (ii) warrant that you can grant those rights.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal. 

  1. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  2. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this email address.

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on {#templatemanager.cdate_format}

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 18 Mar 2013 23:03:40 +0000
Samsung Group t/a Time Out Group Limited http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/samsung-group-t%10a-time-out-group-limited/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/samsung-group-t%10a-time-out-group-limited/ {tab=About This Organisation}

 

Samsung Group t/a Time Out Group Limited

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

(Korean: ????) is a multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul, South Korea. It is South Korea's largest chaebol and is the world's largest private conglomerate by revenue with an annual revenue of US $72.5 billion in 2009. The Samsung Group comprises numerous international affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand including Samsung Electronics, Samsung Heavy Industries, Samsung Engineering, Samsung C&T, Samsung Life Insurance. Samsung Everland, South Korea's first theme park opened in 1976 as Yongin Farmland. CC Wikipedia

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see TimeOut London/New York; closing 10 Feb 2013|blue}

 

Share Your Now London/New York

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Copyright in all photographs submitted for this competition remains with the respective entrants. However, entrants agree that by submitting a photograph to the competition, they grant Time Out and Samsung each a royalty-free, perpetual irrevocable worldwide licence to use and republish their photograph(s). This includes displaying the photograph on timeout.com/shareyournow, sharing through social media and publication by both Samsung and Time Out worldwide in any of their publications, their websites and/or in any promotional material. You agree that we may cut, edit or arrange your photograph(s) where appropriate to appear in print or online.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work forever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  2. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

Sponsors

Time Out Group Ltd.
Samsung 

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address/contact competitions@timeout.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

Alternatively, or as well as, you can submit the free image we have prepared to register your complaint simply by entering the free image to the contest.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

{/slides}

 

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

 

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.

 

© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Sat, 09 Feb 2013 20:36:25 +0000
Redcar and Cleveland http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/redcar-and-cleveland/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/redcar-and-cleveland/ {tab=About This Organisation}

Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council s responsible for delivering a large number of key services right across the Borough. (UK)

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see Redcar and Cleveland Facebook promo; closing date 29 June 2012|blue}

Redcar and Cleveland

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

3. Photos may be used in future council promotions.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. Terms and conditions have not been published. It is impossible to say how your work will be used. Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights.

  2. The terms and conditions are unclear about how your work will be used. Never submit works to a competition or appeal without knowing how the terms and conditions will affect your rights.

  3. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  4. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  5. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address: communications@redcar-clev

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 03/06/2012 : 22:02:07

{/slides}

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists DO NOT do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
send2ds@gmail.com (Don Schaefer) Rights Off List Mon, 04 Jun 2012 02:01:37 +0000
Connoisseurs Scotland t/a Luxury Scotland http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/connoisseurs-scotland-t%10a-luxury-scotland/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/connoisseurs-scotland-t%10a-luxury-scotland/ {tab=About This Organisation}

Connoisseurs Scotland t/a Luxury Scotland

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

Connoisseurs Scotland is an association of hotels in Scotland trading via a website domain luxuryscotland.co.uk

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see 2012 Anniversary Photo Competition; closing date 30 Sep 2012|blue}

2012 Anniversary Photo Competition

TERMS AND CONDITIONS (extract)

6.3. By submitting a photograph you grant to us a perpetual, irrevocable, royalty free licence to use the submitted photograph and all intellectual property rights in it on our website www.luxuryscotland.co.uk and www.luxuryscotlandcompetition.com and in digital or printed form as part of marketing promotions and brochures by Connoisseurs Scotland (including adapting, or modifying, it for operational or editorial reasons).

6.4. Subject to the preceding paragraph, copyright in your submissions will remain with you and the permission detailed above is not exclusive. You can continue to use the submission and allow others to do so.

6.5. Publication of an entry does not mean that it has been selected for a prize.

6.6. We will not use the photographs for any other commercial uses without your permission.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition.

  1. The terms and conditions do not state you will always be credited when your work is reproduced. One of your most important moral rights is that you should be credited as the author of a work whenever it is reproduced.

  2. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition or appeal. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only in a permanent winners gallery with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition or appeal.

  3. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition or appeal. Your work will be used for other purposes. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition or appeal. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work and to set a time limit on such use. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

#None listed

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address for the Chief Executive, Jeremy Hawkings; jeremyhawkings@btconnect.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 02/03/2012

{/slides}

{tab=About the Artists' Bill of Rights}

The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

bill_of_rights_logo

The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

{/tabs}

]]>
photo@gordon-c-harrison.co.uk (Gordon Harrison) Rights Off List Fri, 02 Mar 2012 18:17:19 +0000
Michael & Dawn Powell Ltd t/a Cornish Traditional Holidays, UK http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/michael-%26-dawn-powell-ltd-t%10a-cornish-traditional-holidays,-uk/ http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/competition-lists/rights-off-list/michael-%26-dawn-powell-ltd-t%10a-cornish-traditional-holidays,-uk/ {tab=About This Organisation}

Michael & Dawn Powell Ltd t/a Cornish Traditional Holidays, UK

About this Organisation

traffic-light-stop

Cornish Traditional Cottages is a holiday letting agency with approximately 400 cottages, houses, bungalows and a few apartments on its books throughout Cornwall in the UK. Further information about this company is available here.

About this Report

Competitions or appeals seeking submissions of creative works from the public, works such as photos, videos, poems, stories, music, etc., are reviewed by the Artists' Bill of Rights campaign. The reviews are to help you decide whether or not you should participate in the competition or appeal. When you create a work (e.g. a photo) the law automatically makes you the sole beneficiary of certain rights over that work. These rights are called intellectual property rights. Note: Rights for works created in the course of employment are usually owned by the employer (i.e. works for hire).

Rights have a value and you are free to decide what that value is. If a person or organisation wants to use your work to promote something, you have the right to refuse permission or to set a fee for a specific use. More information about intellectual property rights and their value to you can be read in our Guide to Rights & Licensing.

{slide= How this Organisation's Competitions or Appeals are Listed}

Listed below in order of closing date are the competitions or appeals promoted by this organisation that we have reviewed.  For each we detail how their terms and conditions will exploit your rights. To read our review(s) just click on any competition/appeal title below.

{slide=CLICK HERE to see What I Love about Cornwall; closing date 1 Aug 2012|blue}

What I Love about Cornwall

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

By entering this competition, all contestants hereby consent (except where prohibited) to the use by CTC of the contestant's name, age, photograph, hometown address, and entry without any further compensation.

  • By submitting an entry to the Competition, you give Cornish Traditional Cottages (CTC):
    • Permission for your entry to be published in any promotional material and grant CTC a non-exclusive, royalty-free, worldwide licence to republish your Competition entry (edited if required) in electronic format and hard copy for promotional purposes free of charge, and;
    • The right to use your name and town or city of residence for the sole purpose of identifying You as the author of your entry and/or as a winner of the Competition.

HOW THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT YOU

The following notes explain how the above terms and conditions affect your rights in respect of any works you submit to the above competition or appeal.

  1. The terms and conditions are granting the organiser unlimited use of your work for ever. For non-winning works a usage time limit of 5 years or less should be set with usage limited solely to promoting the competition. It is permissable to use winning works for ever but only with the sole purpose of promoting a recurring competition, and no other purpose.

  2. The terms and conditions grant the organiser the right to use your work beyond that needed to promote the competition. Your work will be used to promote the company's business in perpetuity with no compensation ever paid to you. Usage of your work should be restricted solely to promoting the competition. If the organisation wishes to use your work for any other purpose they should negotiate with you independently of the competition. You should have the right to negotiate an appropriate fee for the specific use they want to make of your work. You should also have the right to refuse use of your work. For further information on fees and licensing refer to the Introduction to Rights and Licensing.

  3. In essence you are being asked to work for free.

We suggest that authors who wish to write about Cornwall should do so, but instead of submitting it to the above competition submit it to the Cornwall Living magazine (for example) and if the magazine shows interest then you will have the opportunity to negotiate a publishing fee with them. You'll have no opportunity to negotiate a fee with Cornwall Traditional Cottages.

We thank Mistakes Writers Make for bringing this 'competition' to our attention.

For further guidance please read the Bill of Rights for Artists.

We have written to this organisation, submitted a link to this report and urged them to adjust the competition rules as set out in the ABoR Principles document.

SPONSORS

None listed

CONTACT

To write to the organiser and urge them to adopt the principles set out in the Artists' Bill of Rights use this this email address; story@corncott.com

If time is at a premium for you we have prepared a complaint email which you can copy and send to the organiser.

The Artists' Bill of Rights campaign depends on your active support, your help will make a difference.

Updated on 29/02/2012

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The Artists' Bill of Rights principles for Creative Competitions

Competitions which meet all the standards set out in the Bill of Rights For Artists do not do any of the following -

  • claim copyright
  • claim exclusive use
  • seek waiving of moral rights
  • fail to give a credit for all free usage
  • add, alter, or remove metadata from submissions
  • seek usage rights other than for promoting the contest and no other purpose. Note that a book, posters, cards, or a calendar are seen as legitimate ways of promoting the contest and defraying costs
  • seek free usage rights in excess of 5 years
  • use the submissions commercially without the entrant's agreement, and such commercial usage is to be subject to a freely negotiated license independently of the competition.
  • make it a condition of winning that an entrant must sign a commercial usage agreement
  • fail to publish all documents on the competition website that an entrant may have to sign
  • fail to name the judges for this or last year's competition
  • fail to explicitly state all the organisations who will acquire rights to the submissions
  • set a closing date more than 18 months after the contest launch date
  • fail to make clear statements of rights claimed and how submissions are used.

We have written an Organisers Guide to the Bill of Rights to help organisers draft terms and conditions that respect the rights of entrants and at the same time provide legal protection for the organiser.


© Bill of Rights Supporters Group

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The above text may be reproduced providing a link is given to the Bill of Rights For Artists.

Any text reproduced in italics in this report has been extracted from a competition or appeal website for the purposes of review.

Organisations who would like to be promoted as a Bill of Rights Supporter and have their competitions promoted on the Rights On List can use this contact form. We look forward to hearing from you.

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photo@gordon-c-harrison.co.uk (Gordon Harrison) Rights Off List Wed, 29 Feb 2012 19:27:54 +0000